?

Log in

No account? Create an account

arhyalon

Recent Entries

You are viewing the most recent 10 entries

October 5th, 2018

09:38 am: Guinea Pig Writers Needed!

The Art and Craft of Writing

a Superversive Writing Class

 

For some time, Superversive Press has been talking about putting out a writing course–a series of videos or podcasts. This class would be based on my Writing Tips, my The Three Things I Tell Everyone–my collected information gathered from my years as a professional editor, and on The Art and Craft of Writing, a class I taught last fall.

However, before we can do this, I have to put words on (electronic) paper and figure out what it is that we want to say in each class.

To encourage myself to do this, I am thinking of offering a writing course this November. The course would be specifically tailored to help people doing NANOWRIMO or revising a Work In Progress. The details are as follows.

When: Month of November

Subjects to include:

Description, Mood, Genre, Setting
Adding senses
Backstory vs. Revelation
Adding Exposition

Plot we’ve got, quite a lot
Strong openings
Two Strings
The Trick
Payload

Writing Three Dimensional Characters
Dynamic Characters
Goals and Motivation
The Foil

Heart and Soul – adding emotion
Interior dialogue
“Pink” passages

Cost: $25

This class will be a text-based class with simple exercises designed to help improve style, characters, plot and more. 

Slots will be filled on a first come, first served basis.

Comments

 

 

 

Originally posted to Welcome to Arhyalon. (link)

Tags: ,

August 29th, 2018

01:12 pm: DragonCon Sale!

In honor of DragonCon, the Books of Unexpected Enlightenment are all on sale:

Free on Friday, August 31st and Saturday September 1st:

On sale Thursday, August 30th to Tuesday September 3d

(Book Three is on sale in the UK as well)

Originally posted to Welcome to Arhyalon. (link)

Tags: , , ,

July 20th, 2018

11:01 am: Can We Pray About the Weather

I have an article in the Journal this month (writing as LJ Wright).  Enjoy!

 

Can we pray about the weather?

By L. J. Wright

From the July 2018 issue of The Christian Science Journal


“I don’t even know how to pray about that!” a friend complained recently when discussing a current world issue. “How could my prayer affect something so … big?”

I had to smile, because I remembered a time when I would have given the same answer: Pray about world peace, world hunger, an epidemic, troubling weather patterns? What would be the point? Things like that don’t change. Even if they did, how would I ever discover that my prayers had done any good?

As I’ve persisted in my study of Christian Science, however, I’ve realized more and more that we can pray about larger issues, and, more importantly, we can reasonably expect results. I have learned that I can and should pray about many of the larger issues of today. While I do not always receive a confirmation of the efficacy of my prayers, at times I have seen evidence of God’s grace in action.

One of the issues many people are concerned about today is the weather. Mary Baker Eddy felt strongly that Christian Scientists should pray about the weather, and some reminiscences by her household workers tell what she said about how to handle the weather through Christian Science. For example, she is recorded as once saying, “The weather expresses our concept of it and can be handled as any claim if you do not hold it as something apart from you, governed by some other power or almanac. God governs all. This is the way Jesus stilled the tempest” (We Knew Mary Baker Eddy, Expanded Edition, Volume II, p. 287). Among these reminiscences are also testimonies of storms being dispelled by Mrs. Eddy’s prayers (see, for example, We Knew Mary Baker Eddy, Expanded Edition, Volume II, pp. 213–215). 

I love praying about the weather. I often pray for a sense of harmony between man and nature. I reason that “God saw every thing that he had made, and, behold, it was very good” (Genesis 1:31). Therefore, nothing can exist that is harmful or inharmonious. This means the weather must be in harmony with the needs of nature and also with humanity. One cannot be left out to favor the other.

Read the rest…

Originally posted to Welcome to Arhyalon. (link)

Tags: ,

June 28th, 2018

06:01 pm: LibertyCon, Here We Come!

John and I will be at Liberty Con in Chattanooga this weekend. In honor of this, all my books are on sale:

Free 

(June 29th to July 1st)

$1.99  

$2.99

$3.99

Comments

Originally posted to Welcome to Arhyalon. (link)

June 26th, 2018

11:36 pm: Of Mice and Men Without Chests

I am posting here an article from another site that is on a common theme with my article The Goals of the Superversive

Of Mice and Men Without Chests

By ANNA GITHENS

At first glance one might surmise that the title of this article alludes to the characters in John Steinbeck’s classic. Truthfully, while reading Of Mice and Men I grew to like the characters and found myself empathizing with some of their hardships. A good author is able to pull his readers into the world of his characters. While C.S. Lewis’s metaphor “men without chests” could be ascribed to the characters in Of Mice and Men, a more critical concern at hand is the impression the novel has made on young readers for more than a half-century. What has been their take-away? How has this short, yet harrowing, novella affected the hearts and minds of readers and our overall culture? Why does it continue to be one of the most popular required reading selections in middle schools and high schools across America?

In case you are not familiar with Of Mice and Men the story concludes with an act that has been described as “mercy killing.” One of the main characters, Lennie, a mentally disabled man who is like a big, clumsy, guileless teddy bear unaware of his own physical strength, accidentally breaks the neck of a young woman—who happens to be his boss’s daughter-in-law—on the ranch where he is living and working. George, Lennie’s closest friend and caretaker, finds the body and after some deliberation with his friend Candy, decides to shoot Lennie in the back of the head since the deceased woman’s husband and other men were coming to kill him. What’s also implied is that George wished to spare him from what he feared would be either a brutal death or a life of imprisonment and suffering.

I do not wish to presume Mr. Steinbeck’s intentions when he penned Of Mice and Men. The purpose of this article is not to focus on the author or characters in his novel per se, but on the culture we have created, which has ensued, in large part, from what we put into our minds.

St. John Paul II’s 1995 Encyclical Evangelium Vitae (The Gospel of Life) warns of an emerging culture “actively fostered by powerful cultural, economic and political currents which encourage an idea of society excessively concerned with efficiency.” He alerts us further to “a culture which denies solidarity and in many cases takes the form of a veritable ‘culture of death.’” In Pope Francis’s recent apostolic exhortation, Gaudete et exsultate (Rejoice and be glad) he expresses grave concern for “the vulnerable infirm and elderly exposed to covert euthanasia” and “the dignity of a human life, which is always sacred and demands love for each person, regardless of his or her stage of development.”

Presently, 68 percent of Americans believe in physician-assisted suicide (up 10 percentage points from last year), now legal in seven states. The Down Syndrome abortion rate has increased to over 90 percent in Iceland, Denmark, and Australia, prompting Special Olympian Frank Stephens to speak out in defense of his life. Interesting that the character Lennie in Of Mice and Men was mentally and physically challenged.

Recently little Alfie Evans lost the battle for his life since the British High Court ruled he should be taken off life support. Despite the fact that he was granted Italian citizenship and offered treatment at Vatican-owned Bambino Gesu Pediatric Hospital, the judge ruled, “this would not be in his best interest.”

Perhaps some responsibility for our culture of death lies not only in our selection of literature but also in how less-than-ideal literature (or what many consider to be less-than-ideal) is taught. A book that appears to oppose meritorious ideals can also be used to champion them. There is a flip side to every story. For example, a teacher could pose the following questions to her students:

  • What would be your ideal ending to Of Mice and Men?
  • Do you think George did the right thing? Why or why not?
  • What if the authorities saw that Lennie had a mental illness and they understood he was not entirely at fault?
  • What if George was able to defend Lennie and got him the help he needed?

When you take someone’s fate into your own hands you are haunted by the “what ifs” for the rest of your life. It’s doubtful that the modern day teacher would be so inclined to seize such an ideal opportunity to open up a discussion on morality. Her potential loss of a job in this politically correct climate in our schools precludes her from doing so. Nevertheless, questions should be presented to encourage students to think outside the box of secular relativism and venture into the infinite beyond.

Read more…

 

Originally posted to Welcome to Arhyalon. (link)

Tags: ,

May 22nd, 2018

08:56 am: Twilight Giveaway

Hello all,

I ams participating in a mailing list builder with the excellent small press, Silver Empire. This includes a giveaway package of cool Twilight bling for one lucky winner. 

Win! $200.00 in Twilight goodies!

 

One Lucky Winner!

Prizes include:

Twilight Forever: The Complete Saga [Blu-ray + Digital], The Twilight Saga White Collection, TEAM EDWARD Except when Jacob is Shirtless on Adult & Youth Cotton T-Shirt , The Twilight Saga: The Official Illustrated Guide, Twilight "Eclipse" Bellas Engagement Ring Prop Replica, CafePress – Mrs. Cullen Mug – Unique Coffee Mug, Coffee Cup, New Moon: The Graphic Novel, Vol. 1 (The Twilight Saga), Twilight: The Graphic Novel Collector's Edition (The Twilight Saga), Twilight Movie Poster w/Bella & Edward 24 X 36 Poster Print, Barbie Collector The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part II Bella Doll

(Editions may not be the exact ones pictured.)

Prizes awarded: May 31, 2018 12:00 a.m. CDT

How do I participate?

It's simple. Sign up for our mailing lists.

Click the link:  https://silverempire.org/giveaways/twilight/

We don´t sell/share your data. You can unsubscribe to the individual lists as soon as the giveaway is over, but we hope you will stick around.

 

#Win the Ultimate
#Twilight Prize Pack!
#AmReading
#Giveaway

 

 

Originally posted to Welcome to Arhyalon. (link)

Tags: , , ,

April 24th, 2018

02:46 am: HOW ROANOKE CAME TO BE — PART ONE

It occurs to me that not everyone here automatically visits Fantastic Schools and Where to Find Them. This might be of interest to some:

How Roanoke came to be – the long version


Roanoke Academy for the Sorcerous Arts

 

Many years ago, a couple of yeas after graduating from college, I was working at a Walden Books in a mall. In college, John and I had done a lot of roleplaying. Now we were a couple and living in New York, north of the city, but now, it was hard for us to find people to play with. So I did what any sensible person would do.

I kept an eagle eye on the D&D shelf in the bookstore.

A brief aside: Wizards of the Coast, the company that owned D&D, had sent the store a bookshelf to hold their books—not those silly cardboard things you see in stores nowadays. This thing was solid. I still have it. The bookstore let me take it home as a wedding present. I still have it today. It is in the boys room. But I digress.

Whenever anyone came to look at the D&D books, I would go introduce myself and see if they were interested in getting together for a game. One of the people I spoke to thus was a teenage boy, about 13 or 14. We got to talking and eventually, John and I got together with him and one of his friends to play a roleplaying game. The young man liked the game, but his friend became absolutely obsessed with it. (I was obsessed with it, too. It was that kind of game.)

That friend was a young man named Mark Whipple.

Now Mark did not read well.  He had read very few books in his life. But when he caught on that if he read the books John was stealing stuff from for his game, he would do better in the game, he started reading! He read Roger Zelazny’s entire Amber series. At that point, he was hooked on reading, and he started reading all sorts of stuff.

At some point, John said to this young man that if he went to St. John’s, the college John and I had attended, we would visit every other weekend and run a game.

Mark did. This young man who had not been a reader attended a school that was 95% reading, and we visited almost every weekend while he was there. (We still have a number of good friends, including our kids’ godfather whom we met during that period.)

The game John was running was not an easy game. If roleplaying games had settings like video games, this one was set on hard. It was not a rules bound game, like D&D. You had free reign of action, and the ability to try to do anything you wished—but so did your adversaries. And, with John running the game, the adversaries were clever and vivid. It was like living in your favorite novel! John made Mark really work for his successes. But Mark refused to be daunted

Now, you are probably wondering what does this story have to do with Roanoke Academy for the Sorcerous Arts?

The answer is: nearly everything.

Read the rest…

 

 

Originally posted to Welcome to Arhyalon. (link)

April 16th, 2018

08:30 pm: Appearing at Ravencon –April 20th and 21st

Hey all, 

John and I will be at Ravencon on Friday and Saturday, April 20th and 21st.

Con info available at the Ravencon website.

 

 

 

 

Comments

Originally posted to Welcome to Arhyalon. (link)

Tags: ,

April 2nd, 2018

06:01 pm: A Light in the Darkness — New Christian Fantasy/SF newsletter

Hey Folks, Jagi here again!

Just wanted to let everyone know that Superversive Press now has a Christian Fantasy and Science Fiction Newsletter called: A Light in the Darkness.

This newsletter offers book news, freebies–ebooklets and wallpaper graphics–plus news of new releases, sales, and other intriguing topics.

Everyone who subscribes will get access to Sloth by our own Frank Luke (who often comments here) a Twilight Zone like story from his new book: Lou's Bar and Grill: Seven Deadly Tales — a book of faith and Faustian bargains– as well as access to a short ebook of a few of my most popular articles from the original Superversive blog.

Subscribe to:
A Light in the Darkness

Comments

 

 

 

Originally posted to Welcome to Arhyalon. (link)

Tags:

March 29th, 2018

11:26 pm: Happy Birthday, Rachel and Sigfried!

 
Birthdays are a time of celebrations
 
Even the birthdays of imaginary characters. In the Books of Unexpected Enlightenment, Rachel Griffin's birthday is March 30st, and Sigfried Smith's birthday is April 1st (falls on Easter this year.) The closeness of their birthdays allows them both to be the same age for two days every year!In honor of Rachel and Sigfried's birthday, three of their books are going to be on sale from March 29th to April 2nd.
 
        The Raven, The Elf, and Rachel  FREE (March 31 to April 2)
 
                Rachel and the Many-Spendered Dreamland — on sale for $1.99
 
 The Awful Truth About Forgetting — on sale for $2.99
 
And the fourth will be FREE for March 30th only:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Originally posted to Welcome to Arhyalon. (link)

Powered by LiveJournal.com