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arhyalon

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09:14 am: Frankly, My Dear, I Don't Give A Damn!

Avatar is doing quite well in the box offices...but it's kind of eerie that, if you adjust for inflation, the top ticketseller is still 1939's Gone With The Wind.



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From:juliet_winters
Date:January 26th, 2010 02:54 pm (UTC)
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My mother went to school with someone from Atlanta named Seine. In no uncertain terms were the inhabitants of said city happy with the casting of that no-account Clark Gable as Rhett Butler.
I really must read the book sometime.
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From:arhyalon
Date:January 26th, 2010 03:10 pm (UTC)
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I absolutely utterly love that book. So much so that I was disappointed with the movie the first time I saw it. I thought Vivian Leigh just wasn't right. Funny thing is, now I can't imagine anyone else in the role.

It's a very well written book about the Civil War from the point of view of those who stayed home. There is a great deal of history and thought in the book that never made it into the movie.

I was reading the book on a trip once. When John asked me to drive home, I told him he'd have to read it aloud to me. He enjoyed what he read so much, he borrowed it when we got home and finished it. While I seldom reread the whole book, there are parts I read over and over.
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From:jjbrannon
Date:January 26th, 2010 09:23 pm (UTC)

GWTW

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My cousin gave me a plush leather-covered & ribboned-bookmark edition for my birthday in 1982, which I stayed up until three in the morning to read, locked in the downstairs bathroom so my sobbing wouldn't awaken anyone else in the house.

Naturally, someone permanently borrowed my copy.


JJB
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From:bojojoti
Date:January 26th, 2010 07:41 pm (UTC)
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Gone with the Wind has staying power. Avatar will be known for its CGI, but that novelty will pass; its story won't pass the test of time.
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From:kokorognosis
Date:January 26th, 2010 07:44 pm (UTC)
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If by, "the test of time," you mean, "the time it takes for the movie to end and it's no longer impolite in to talk in the theater," I agree.
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From:annafirtree
Date:January 26th, 2010 11:12 pm (UTC)
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I thought it was "my dear", not "darling".
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From:carbonelle
Date:January 27th, 2010 04:37 am (UTC)

It's neither

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"My dear, I don't give a damn."

Honestly, it's a wonder pedants aren't better-loved :-)
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From:arhyalon
Date:January 27th, 2010 02:13 pm (UTC)
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Yes...I knew I couldn't quite recall it when I wrote the post, but figured it got the point across. ;-)
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From:partywhipple
Date:January 27th, 2010 03:08 am (UTC)
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I think it should always be by number of tickets sold. that's it.
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From:arhyalon
Date:January 27th, 2010 02:15 pm (UTC)
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Box Office Mojo tracks ticket sales, but you have to be a member to see that info. I've always wanted to, but haven't gotten around to paying membership fee.

Last I checked, though, Gone With the Wind was still on the 100 moneymakers list, though it moves closer to the bottom each year. That means it not only had more ticket sales, but also made an ungodly amount of money for its time. But then, it ran for years and years. The article I just saw was only talking about the first year of Gone With the Wind, and it was still way ahead.
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From:princejvstin
Date:January 27th, 2010 11:05 am (UTC)
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Well, there are reasons why GWTW is likely never to be beat, besides the obvious one (its level of quality as a movie)

It came out during the Great Depression, in a much less media saturated landscape. No movie today will have those advantages. There is a similar phenomenon on the popularity of TV shows.

Edited at 2010-01-27 11:05 am (UTC)
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From:arhyalon
Date:January 27th, 2010 02:17 pm (UTC)
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It was just after the bulk of the Depression, the book was a huge phenomena, and it was just before WWII changed things.

But it wasn't the only really good movie that year. That was before Oscar nominations were limited to 5. There were nine that year. One of the others was Wizard of Oz.
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